River Rumba Regatta Floats Boats In Muskogee - NewsOn6.com - Tulsa, OK - News, Weather, Video and Sports - KOTV.com |

River Rumba Regatta Floats Boats In Muskogee

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Pirate ships and flaming vessels, cardboard boaters were ready to rumble down the Arkansas River for the Rumba Regatta. Pirate ships and flaming vessels, cardboard boaters were ready to rumble down the Arkansas River for the Rumba Regatta.
Anyone could enter. But, the rules strictly say the boats can only be made out of cardboard, glue, and duct tape, with a little paint for some personality. Anyone could enter. But, the rules strictly say the boats can only be made out of cardboard, glue, and duct tape, with a little paint for some personality.

By Tara Vreeland, The News On 6

MUSKOGEE, OK -- Would you ever think that a boat made of cardboard, glue, and duct tape could really float?  Most would be reluctant to step into a ship made of such materials. But, sink or swim, that's exactly what was happening on Saturday at the River Rumba Regatta at Three Forks Harbor in Muskogee.

Pirate ships and flaming vessels, cardboard boaters were ready to rumble down the Arkansas River for the Rumba Regatta.  Anyone could enter. But, the rules strictly say the boats can only be made out of cardboard, glue, and duct tape, with a little paint for some personality.

Sailors took on the high seas to paddle 100 yards to the finish line. Some were victorious. Others sank.

Wayne McManus and his wife moved to Muskogee in an unconventional way.

"Came here by water on this boat last spring. It was a 1,134 mile trip," said Wayne McManus.

McManus is the harbor master for the new Three Forks Harbor.

The harbor provides boating access to the Arkansas, Verdigris and Grand Rivers. The project is turning the east banks into a recreational facility. McManus says Oklahoma's rivers have endless potential.

"You can do anything on the river that you can do on a lake, plus you can go somewhere," said Harbor Master Wayne McManus.

The rivers used to be the main source of transportation until the railroad came into play in Muskogee in 1871.

Now water lovers like McManus hope the new harbor and the fun of the regatta will bring out landlocked Oklahomans looking for a little adventure because Oklahoma's rivers can take you anywhere.

 "Anywhere in the world from right here. Sure enough," said Harbor Master Wayne McManus.

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