Rick Wells, News On 6

TULSA, Oklahoma -- How to make the benefits of a rainy morning last for several days to come. That's just one of the things News On 6 reporter Rick Wells learned at a Grogg's Green Barn.

"Grogg for our last name, Green because we are all organic and eco friendly, and barn because of the shape of the building," Carla Grogg said.

For Carla and Kelly Grogg, it represents about eight years of dreaming and planning. They've always composted, used organic fertilizers and insect control, and tried to landscape with native plants. So, opening the business is a way of preaching what they've practiced.

If you're looking for beneficial insects, they got them.  There are 1,500 of them. You can get many kinds, like bugs that eat the bugs that eat your plants.

There's a whole section of gardening tools for kids and many of the tools for adults are made from recycled steel.

"Gloves are made of recycled plastics," Carla said.

There are natural and organic fertilizers and lots of native plants.

"Some are bird attractants, some are butterfly attractants, hummingbird, if you want to attract all that to your yard and garden," Carla said.

Carla she was excited to show off their 4,000 gallon underground cistern.

"You can hear it filling up from our gutters," she said.

The cistern collects rainwater and in a process they call "harvesting," they can take one rainy morning and make it last for days.

Grogg's is located on 61st just east of Mingo in Tulsa. They conduct classes and workshops on organic and eco-friendly gardening.