Ashli Sims, News On 6

TULSA, Oklahoma -- Extreme weather across the country could be causing a pumpkin problem.

Two Tulsa-area pumpkin patches had a plethora of pumpkins ready for carving as of Thursday. But one owner said it may not be that way for long.

They're the symbol of the season, but pumpkins may grow scarce this fall. Whether you're looking for traditional orange or trendy white or blue, there may be some slim pickings in the patch this year. And two weather extremes are too blame.

The extreme dry heat down south shriveled thousands of gourds. And the torrential rains of Hurricane Irene up north drowned thousands more.

"They're actually short. you take the hot weather all in Texas and all over the heat really hurts," said Don Carmichael, who sells pumpkins in Bixby.

At Carmichael's, they say they've kept their prices down and the variety up, but they had to call in a few favors from long-time suppliers to do it.

"I know some of the odd ball stuff is a little short. Some of the mini-pumpkins are a little short, but we managed to get what we need," said owner Don Carmichael.

Some wholesalers in the northeast have doubled their prices to try to make up for their water-logged crops.

While others are hoping for a late harvest, but the margin of error to get them to stores is razor thin.

The folks at Carmichael's say the moral of this story... go pumpkin picking early.