TULSA, Oklahoma - The National Indian Gaming Commission has determined the fate of the proposed Kialegee casino in Broken Arrow, U.S. Rep. John Sullivan said in a statement on Friday.

The NIGC, citing the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, ruled the land is not Kialegee tribal land and is not eligible for gaming.

The Solicitor General at the Bureau of Indian Affairs concurs with the decision of the NIGC, Sullivan's office said.

The NIGC's ruling echoes what a judge determined last week in federal court.

A federal judge issued an injunction halting construction on the casino. He ruled the sisters who own the land are members of the Muscogee Creek Nation and not members of the Kialegee tribe, so the tribe does not have jurisdiction over the land.

The judge also agreed with the state that the Kialegees can't make a deal with a related tribe to open a casino on land that isn't theirs.

"The citizens of Broken Arrow can rest assured that there will never be a casino built on that land," Sullivan, who has been an active and outspoken opponent to the casino plans, said Friday.