TULSA, Oklahoma - A local group is using Native American culture to bring people to a safe and sober New Year's Eve celebration.

The 14th annual New Year's Eve Powwow held in downtown Tulsa gets bigger every year.

The powwow may be rooted in Native American tradition and host a wide range of Native American vendors, but it's for anyone who wants to enjoy a cultural experience and have a safe place to celebrate free from alcohol, drugs or other influences.

Dancers in traditional dress stepped to the beat of the drum, representing tribes and traditions from across the state and the country.

"Well as we always say, you bring in the New Year right, you bring it in good, and it's like, that's how your whole year is going to be," said powwow dancer, Hyde Toppah.

The Friends of Sobriety group has been welcoming the New Year in the spiritual and sober way for years after the event was originally started by member Lorainne Bosin 14 years ago.

It's become a tradition for many.

"I, myself, have been in recovery for several years and my friend, her husband passed away, so me and my husband help her carry this powwow on because this meant a lot to us and means a lot to other people," said Kristie Wolf-Norris with Friends of Sobriety.

It's safe place for those who want to celebrate heritage, experience something new and start 2015 with a clear head.

"When you're doing something like this, you can't be under the influence of alcohol, it's looked down upon. The thing that you want to do is make sure that you come out here and look your best, you want to be your best, and you want to act your best," Toppah said.

It's a way to respect the centuries-old traditions, the people who hold them dear and celebrate the start to a new beginning.

"It's a great way to bring in the New Year," said Toppah.

The powwow will go until midnight to ring in 2015.