TULSA, Oklahoma - Healthcare can be expensive, and there's a growing group in Green Country who just can't afford the cost.

They're from Myanmar and have been granted asylum in the United States on the basis of religious persecution, and a new, free medical clinic will now serve their needs.

One Myanmar refugee church raised money to pay for the clinic, and the medical services it will provide will change lives.

Ninghau Teithul is one of almost 4,000 Burmese people living in the Tulsa area. Many are uninsured because of the high cost of health care and, for some, this is their first experience with a doctor.

"When we check our blood, we find out that we had high blood pressure, and then diabetes, some even Hepatitis B, and some, Hepatitis C," Teithul said.

He said volunteers with The Good Samaritan are treating and teaching them.

The Good Samaritan and a dozen Burmese refugee churches collaborated to buy the clinic on wheels.

Medical Director Laurel Williston said it will travel to serve thousands of patients, but will be at the Full Gospel Assembly International Church every Monday, specifically for the Myanmar community.

"Being able to go to where they live when they don't have other transportation available is really helpful for them," Williston said.

The clinic has three exam rooms and doctors are able to run lab tests or prescribe sample medication.

Nurse Coordinator Joy Alice Morrow said the clinic will prevent emergency room visits.

"Instead of them going to their respective ERs and using that and the very expensive price of just having a common cold, or even hypertension or a diabetic crisis treated at the ER, they're able to do it here," she said.

Teithul said, 'I have heard your prayer and see your tears and you will be healed.' That verse make me that I want to help my people with The Good Samaritan."

The Good Samaritan has two other mobile clinics that travel to several locations. You can learn more here.