OKLAHOMA CITY - Many Oklahomans are fired up about the confederate flag, even though it recently became a trending topic because of events happening out of state.

Saturday dozens of people on both sides of the spectrum made their voices heard.

A group of Oklahomans spent the day parading through the metro on a mission led by Andrew Duncomb, who called himself "black rebel."

“This is us trying to say that we have our rights. We have a right to fly our flag and we’re not taking it down,” he said.

Andrew and about 30 trucks carrying confederate flags drove together, taking their spectacle from street to street, making a stop at the State Capitol.

“Our goal was to show that the South isn’t about racism. Everybody out here that’s flying this flag don’t believe that it’s about hate and color. They believe it’s about southern pride and heritage,” Andrew told News 9.

The group ended up in west Oklahoma City, parked at a place where honks and hollers could be heard -- some in support of their display. But the backlash wasn't far behind. News 9 received calls and comments from hundreds of people. Many were extremely disappointed in what went on.

“I just wish that they would stop the hate,” said Russell Rodriguez, a Midwest City resident.

Russell said he believes the flag is flown by those harboring racist beliefs.

“It’s a lot of racial hatred. People can say that it’s supporting the history of the South or part of southern heritage, but to me, the confederate flag has always stood for nothing but hate and always will be,” Russell added.

Andrew said that is part of the problem.

“The reason why America has not moved past that completely is because people won’t forget the past … they are still holding on to the hate that had happened in the past,” he said.

Despite his concerns with keeping what he called his heritage alive, he asked that people to forget the flag's association with racism.