TULSA, Oklahoma - The police chief admits the video is disturbing to watch and says Terence Crutcher was not armed. 

The attorney for the officer says it doesn't show the minutes leading up to the shooting, where he says Terence Crutcher raised his hands, then put them toward his pocket several times while ignoring the officer's commands.

On the video, the Tulsa Police Department's helicopter officers can be heard speaking about Crutcher:

Helicopter officer: "This guy's still walking, not following commands."

Second helicopter officer: "Looks like it's time for a Taser."

Helicopter officer: "Feeling that's about to happen."

Second helicopter officer: "Looks like that's a bad dude, maybe on something."

Moments after that conversation in the police helicopter, Shelby fires one shot with her gun as an officer next to her fires a Taser. 

Shelby said Terence Crutcher had one hand in the air and one, reaching into the vehicle.

Her attorney, Scott Wood, said Shelby didn't know the race of the vehicle's owner when she stopped to help. Wood said the officer is a drug recognition expert and believed Crutcher was under the influence of something.

"By the end of the incident, Officer Shelby was screaming at him to stop. He did not obey one single command given to him," said Wood said.

The police chief immediately contacted the Department of Justice to conduct a separate investigation.

"I want to assure our community and assure all of you, and people across the nation looking at this, we will achieve justice," said Tulsa Police Chief Chuck Jordan.

US Attorney Danny Williams said the incident would be completely investigated. 

"Will devote whatever resources necessary to ensure all allegations of serious civil rights violations are fully and completely investigated," Williams said.

The Mayor and DA asked people to be patient.

"We are all in this situation together. We want to see it done in a proper way," said Tulsa Mayor Dewey Bartlett. 

"We need to protect the integrity of the  process," said Tulsa County DA Steve Kunzweiler.

All leaders asked for peace and calm to prevail.

"The main thing is we as citizens, need to know is sit back and wait and let the process take care of itself," said Tulsa City Councilor Jack Henderson.

More on Officer Betty Shelby:

Officer Shelby joined TPD in 2011 after being a deputy for more than five years.

She is a field training officer. 

She has four letters of commendation as well as an Oklahoma meritorious service award.

Records show she's had two excessive force complaints. Both were unfounded.