We're seeing it more often: surveillance video showing thieves as they burglarize homes and businesses.

More people are buying cameras, so where's the best place to put them?

Police say over the last five years, home surveillance video is leading to more arrests and yet another Tulsa homeowner hopes he'll have the same luck.

Daniel Rogers watched live this morning as a surveillance camera captured a woman walk behind his house, pick up a piece of art and walk away, all in broad daylight.

"I could see that someone had pulled into my driveway and then I was able to basically to watch her, go into my courtyard and take a piece of art and then walk out with it," Rogers said.

Rogers says the art that was stolen was irreplaceable.

"It's something my grandmother bought me about 20 years ago and I doubt it can be replaced, I've never seen anything like it, its probably worth in my opinion maybe $500 bucks but I'll never be able to replace it," Rogers said.

Tulsa police say residential burglaries have actually declined over the last two years compared to the previous two years.

From Aug. 2013 to Aug. 2015 there were about 8,300 reported residential burglaries.

From Aug. 2015 to Aug. 2017 there were about 7,800. 

Investigators say more homeowners are buying surveillance cameras which police say are helpful for catching criminals.

"People are giving us video and that helps us go in and get that out to the public and get a identification on bad guys," said Tulsa Police Sergeant Brian Blair.

Blair says he's also seen an uptick in postings to social media , but says instead of immediately posting, a better option is to give the video to police which gives them a head start.  

"In one instance, people posted things on social media, bad guys knew their pictures were out there before we did and they were able to get rid of all the stuff," Blair said.

Blair says installing both interior and exterior cameras are beneficial to catching criminals. 

He says a good rule of thumb is to make sure they're at eye level.