TULSA, Oklahoma - Millions across the United States - including here in Oklahoma - will turn their eyes to the sky Monday to watch the solar eclipse. A group of Oral Roberts University students are heading north to the path of totality.

Five students are going to St. Joseph, Missouri with ORU's Computing and Mathematics professor.

They'll get to experience 2 minutes and 39 seconds of totality - that's just one second short of the maximum time possible. Totality happens when the moon completely covers the sun.

In Tulsa - it's only expected to cover up about 88 percent of the sun.
 
"I've tried not to look at a lot of pictures because I want to be completely surprised, but I'm expecting to see something that I'll probably only get to see once-in-my-lifetime," said Margaret Dipronio, ORU senior.