TULSA, Oklahoma - Everywhere you looked Monday afternoon, people had their eyes on the sky.

The Guthrie Green was packed with hundreds all day celebrating the rare event.

For several minutes, during totality, a silence came over the crowd as people took in the eclipse.

And the little ones loved it.

"I haven't seen an eclipse before so this is really exciting for me,” said one child.

Outfitted with special glasses, their parents made it a priority that they witness the event and so did hundreds of others in Downtown Tulsa.

"You get to witness being part of something in history,” said spectator Alan Faulk. “This is a bigger event than just coming out and being with a lot of people."

Downtown workplaces even gave a little leeway for people to spend time watching the sun. Crowe & Dunlevy had a full-on watch party for employees.

Carol Welch remembers her last eclipse, 38 years ago, and couldn't wait to experience this one.

"It is coming along and looks like someone has taken a big bite out of cheese. It is just so cool,” said Welch. "Oh no, it's for the grownups. The kids all have another chance. I don't have another chance."

And you didn’t even need glasses to view the eclipse. At The Boxyard, people came up with their own ways to view the once in a lifetime event. Cora Hasegawa and her cousin put together a pinhole camera and was excited to test it out.

"We have sealed up all the holes so there is no light getting into it other than what goes through the aperture,” Hasegawa explained. "I just feel really lucky that I am in the right place for it and in the right country right now."

And if you didn't get the chance to see the eclipse, you don't have to wait another 38 years, but you will have to wait until 2024 for the next total solar eclipse to cross the United States.