TULSA, Oklahoma - The Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation hopes prisoners can generate some tips about old cases.

But, it's a step forward and one back for a murder victim's family.

The new effort has worked in other states but won't get any new attention on a cold case from Tulsa.

This is a new tactic for OSBI to generate leads for cold cases playing cards that will go out into state prisons.

Each card has a photo of a victim, the basics of the case and a tipline where tips can earn a reward.

It's a project Maggie Zingman has pushed for years.

She's the mother of murder victim Brittany Phillips, an 18-year-old girl killed in Tulsa, in 2004.

"With it being so old and so long that we haven't solved it, I was really hoping this would be a new chance, a new surge of getting tips and when I found that out, it was pretty upsetting," Zingman said. 

What she found out was that even though 52 cold cases are on the cards, her daughter's cold case is not.

"I'm happy for every single family that's on it, but I would like to get my daughter's murder solved and we may never solve it and every little thing like this," Zingman said. 

Zingman now travels the country campaigning for victims' families and seeking the spotlight for her daughter's case.

She's especially proud that Oklahoma passed a law to collect DNA from people arrested in felony cases.

But she's discouraged that for lack of funding, it won't start for two more years.

"The funding for the DNA law is the big thing, and OSBI helped fund these cards but we need the legislature to fund the law now," Zingman said. 

The playing cards will be sold in the commissary in state prisons.