TULSA, Oklahoma - The Bever sister who survived when five other members of her family were killed took the stand against her brother, Michael Bever, Friday afternoon.

Michael is accused of murdering his two parents and his three siblings - the youngest of whom was just five years old.

Because of the trauma the surviving sister went through, and to avoid being in the same room as her brother, she testified in a different courtroom with the judge and attorneys. That testimony was shown in a TV screen in the courtroom with the jury.

During the testimony, the now 16-year-old girl recalled that night saying her family went bowling then came home and had dinner. She said she remembers walking in on her brothers and hearing one of them say "are we gonna do this now?"

She said that's when her brother Robert slit her throat and stomach, then stabbed her multiple times in the chest, arms and neck.

The girl, 13 at the time, said she tried to scream and run out of the house, but she collapsed and was brought back in the home.

She said she remembers fading in and out, but heard a knock at the door and realized it was a police officer. She said the next thing she remembers is waking up in a hospital.

During her testimony, the girl got emotional recalling hearing the screams coming from the home.

It also appeared that Michael Bever got emotional and cried during that part of the testimony.

Before the surviving sister took the stand, the jury also heard a 911 call that came from the house. You can hear a child whispering for help, saying his brother is attacking the family. You hear the child say "please don't murder me." Then, another voice comes on the line, says "hello" then disconnects.

Testimony started after opening statements were given.

Prosecutor Sarah McAmis started off by reading the names of every individual victim in the case but really focused on the surviving sister, telling the jury how horribly she was injured and how she had to fight for her life.

The judge ruled Friday that prosecutors would be able to use Michael's confession and his personal journal he kept in jail as evidence.

In court so far, Michael has been very quiet, rarely speaks and rarely looks up.