BERRYHILL, Oklahoma - The summer months bring high heat and increased fire danger across the country. With that in mind, the Berryhill Fire Department is participating in a national fire assessment training program to identify fire risks.

“We used to call it fire season. Now we call it fire year. I mean because across the nation from January one to December 31st we seem to be having active wildfire somewhere across the nation." Said Division Chief Ron Roy.

This pilot session of the Wildland Fire Assessment program is teaching Berryhill firefighters how to identify fire risks. Roy the Division Chief in Central Washington State spearheaded the national program paid for by the U.S. Forest Service.

“We go across the nation teaching fire departments on how to better prepare their homeowners for their homes to successfully survive a wildland fire," said Roy

Berryhill's Fire Chief Michael Hall took me around this property to show me the key things the team looks for.

"They are looking at how the grass comes up to the house. What we are looking for is a five-foot defensible space. Just really nothing. We like lava rock, we like gravel, we like scrubber. Really anything that won't burn," said Hall.

Each home has different fire risks but so making people aware of them helps.

"We can make five dollars’ worth of changes today that just keeps things from happening for the next 50 years," said Hall.

Chief Hall says it is key for neighbors to help each other. If you see a fire risk at your home or your neighbor's home just give the fire department a call and they will come help solve the problem.