Frank Robinson, the first black manager in Major League Baseball and Hall of Fame outfielder, has died at 83. MLB tweeted the news and posted a commemorative picture of the two-time MVP.

Robinson had been in hospice care at his home in Los Angeles.

The MLB Players Alumni Association tweeted Robinson was "a remarkable human being" and noted he had received a Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civil honor, by former President George W. Bush in 2005. They said he "lived an extraordinary life. May he rest in peace."

Robinson hit 586 career home runs and won the Triple Crown while leading the Baltimore Orioles to their first World Series championship in 1966. An All-Star outfielder in 12 seasons, his legacy extended far beyond the batter's box.

Robinson fulfilled his quest to become the first African-American manager in the big leagues when the Cleveland Indians hired him in 1975. In his first at-bat as their player-manager, he hit a home run.

Robinson also managed San Francisco, Baltimore and Montreal. He became the first manager of the Washington Nationals after the franchise moved from Montreal for the 2005 season.

Later, Robinson spent several years working as an executive for MLB.

Robinson was the NL MVP with Cincinnati in 1961 and Baltimore in 1966. The Reds, Orioles and Indians have retired Robinson's No. 20 and saluted him with statues at their ballparks. He's also in the Nationals' Ring of Honor.

MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred issued a statement noting Robinson was "a trailblazer in every sense, whose impact spanned generations."

"He was one of the greatest players in the history of our game, but that was just the beginning of a multifaceted baseball career. Known for his fierce competitive will, Frank made history as the first MVP of both the National and American Leagues, earned the 1966 AL Triple Crown and World Series MVP honors, and was a centerpiece of two World Championship Baltimore Orioles' teams," Manfred said.

"We are deeply saddened by this loss of our friend, colleague and legend, who worked in our game for more than 60 years. On behalf of Major League Baseball, I send my deepest condolences to Frank's wife Barbara, daughter Nichelle, their entire family and the countless fans who admired this great figure of our National Pastime."

As a player, he finished with 586 home runs, 2,943 hits and a lifetime batting average of .294. His managerial record was 1,065-1,176.