TULSA, Oklahoma - First Lady Melania Trump visited Tulsa's Dove Elementary School as part of her "Be Best" campaign. Students didn't know until they got to school that she was even coming.

They figured it out mostly because they were one of the only schools open in the area and saw that she was still coming to town.  Parents had been told that school would be in session despite the weather and to make their best decision about safety.

Those students who were at the school seemed both nervous to meet someone they consider to be famous and excited that she picked their school.

Dove is a college prep, public charter school that won the 2018 National School of Character Award. They have 386 students from pre-K to 6th grade and use Character.org to teach daily character lessons, something any school can use.

The First Lady said that Dove schools embody kindness, respect and strong character every day. Visiting Tulsa was the first stop of going to three states in two days as the First Lady promotes her Be Best initiative that focuses on keeping kids healthy and safe.

She spoke to Pre-K, 2nd, and 6th-grade classrooms, sitting at the tables with the children. She went to a science classroom where some of the older students explained their projects.

Mrs. Trump seemed to make a good impression.

"Kind, and she actually listens when you're talking," said student Alexander Ramirez.

"She was super nice," said sixth-grader Triston Vasquez. "She just felt like a regular person."

In a pre-K class, the children drew actions that show kindness to others. One little girl asked the First Lady if she knew Abraham Lincoln and had other questions too.

Lori Fullbright: "Did you ask her where she lives?"
Amia, Pre-K student: "Yeah."
Lori: "What did she say?"
Amia: "She said at the - I don't know what house that is again."
Lori: "The White House, maybe?"
Amia: "Yeah."

She met with second graders studying people in African American history who have overcome obstacles to make a difference.

Mrs. Trump says character-based education is critical.

"Without character, the world wouldn't be a good place at all," Triston said.

"If you don't have character, everyone's just going to be fighting," Alexander said.

The principal said the visit wasn't about politics but about recognizing the hard work of students, staff and parents.

"I hope she saw students and teachers working very hard to develop people of character," said Principal Maureen Brown.