Tulsans eager to help Hurricane Katrina victims - NewsOn6.com - Tulsa, OK - News, Weather, Video and Sports - KOTV.com |

Tulsans eager to help Hurricane Katrina victims

Updated:
Many Oklahomans are rushing to the aid of hurricane victims, some, a little too quickly.

News on 6 anchor Terry Hood says Tulsa emergency response coordinators got together Thursday afternoon to plead with the people of Tulsa, that no matter how eager you are to help, do not go down to volunteer all by yourself.

Tulsa Mayor Bill LaFortune called the current conditions along the Gulf Coast "dangerous and unsanitary." He along with the American Red Cross - urges citizens to leave the rescuing up to the professionals.

Fire Chief Allen LaCroix says FEMA has asked him to send a team of firefighters to help with search and rescue missions. 10 Tulsa firefighters will leave for New Orleans soon. Emergency response organizations from across the city gathered Thursday afternoon to remind folks they can help Katrina's victims from right here in Tulsa.

Mayor Bill LaFortune: "Come together as a city and a county to provide that safe haven and share those blessings with these victims who are already in our city, who will continue to come to our city and county and they need us."

One group that is offering to help those whom Katrina left homeless is the Circle of Care. The organization runs several housing facilities around northeastern Oklahoma. Five buildings just north of Gilcrease Museum can hold up to 60 people in conditions very similar to those they may have left behind - as they try to start new lives in Tulsa.

Circle of Care director Joanne Morris: "they've just lost everything. And so if we can give them just a little bit of security and stability, then I think that will be great." You can call volunteers at the Circle of Care at 583-9506, extension 203.

In addition, Tulsa Public Schools are getting ready for an influx of new students displaced by Katrina
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