Friend of Sean Sellers gets grand jury subpoena - NewsOn6.com - Tulsa, OK - News, Weather, Video and Sports - KOTV.com |

Friend of Sean Sellers gets grand jury subpoena

Updated:
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) -- Friends of executed triple-murderer Sean Sellers are reportedly under investigation for possible violations of a state law barring a defendant from profiting from a crime.

A spokesman for Attorney General Drew Edmondson refused to confirm a multicounty grand jury investigation, which is secret by law. But a friend of Sellers has received a grand jury subpoena, according to a report in The Daily Oklahoman.

Sand Springs resident Kimberly Frazier is to testify before the multicounty grand jury July 17 in Oklahoma City.

Frazier declined to comment Thursday.

Citing an official investigation by the attorney general's office, the subpoena demanded Frazier "perform a diligent search and produce any and all records ... relating to Sean Sellers" as well as records and information on the publication "Shuladore."

"Shuladore" is a book of poems and love stories that Sellers, a former Satan worshipper, wrote after converting to Christianity in prison, said Norman attorney Steve Presson, who represented Sellers.

Copies of "Shuladore" are offered on a Web site titled "Friends of Sean Sellers." The site offers the book for $10.95 plus shipping and handling.

Sellers' friends paid about $1,500 to publish copies of "Shuladore," Presson said. But the group got only about $100 -- a$1,400 loss -- by selling copies of the book, he said.

Presson said he's furious that Frazier has been subpoenaed.

"It's a horrendous waste of time to be investigating a good, Christian lady's friendship with Sean Sellers ... to be harassing her for her friendship," Presson said.

Sellers was executed in February 1999 for three Oklahoma City murders, including the deaths of convenience store clerk Robert Bower in 1985 and his own mother, Vonda Bellofatto, and stepfather, Paul Lee Bellofatto, in 1986.

Sellers' case drew international attention because he was 16 at the time of the murders.

Under state law, a defendant cannot "receive any proceeds or profits from any source" as a direct or indirect result of his crime, his sentence or the notoriety that his crime or sentence generates.

Any proceeds or profits must be deposited with the district court in a fund that benefits victims, according to the law.

Violation of the statute is a felony punishable by a fine of not less than $10,000 and/or up to 10 years in prison.
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