As the News on Six was the first to tell you last week, the oldest voice in local radio is changing its tune.


KVOO-AM makes it official, it's dumping its "Classic Country" format along with its famous call letters. News on Six reporter Emory Bryan says a format change has not been unexpected in the industry, but is sure to be a disappointment to fans of classic country - for whom KVOO was their only source.


Historian Guy Logsdon can't forget the stars that got their start on KVOO - names like Bob Wills and Johnny Lee Wills, newscaster Paul Harvey and a cowboy named Gene Autry. "It was KVOO where he got his initial experience, in turn, Bob Wills and the Texas playboys in 1934, and then Johnny Lee took over in 1942 when Bob went in the army, and when Johnny went off the air in 1958, it was the longest continusouly broadcast daily radio show in the nation, bar none."


The radio ranch - home of classic country - plans to drop not only the country music, but some of the most famous call letters in the state.

"I hate to see any important Oklahoma, or national voice of history voice disappear, and to change the call letters, all this, there's been rumors for some time, I hate to see it because I love Oklahoma."


KVOO was famous long before Bob Wills came along. That famous microphone helped make Billy Parker make it in the Country Music Hall of Fame. As the "Voice of Oklahoma" the station gave back to the community - and retained a loyal - albeit dwindling core audience of fans who have never forgotten the old sound of western swing - and true country.