Debris Services Available For Those In The County - NewsOn6.com - Tulsa, OK - News, Weather, Video and Sports - KOTV.com |

Debris Services Available For Those In The County

Posted: Updated:
The aftermath of the December ice storm lines many of the roads in the county. The aftermath of the December ice storm lines many of the roads in the county.
Fred Perry says unlike the City of Tulsa, the county doesn't have a contractor on the job. It may take a while before county workers clear the way for homeowners. Fred Perry says unlike the City of Tulsa, the county doesn't have a contractor on the job. It may take a while before county workers clear the way for homeowners.
While city residents have been taking their ice storm debris to drop-sites, folks who live in the county are learning what to do with their broken branches. While city residents have been taking their ice storm debris to drop-sites, folks who live in the county are learning what to do with their broken branches.

While city residents have been taking their ice storm debris to drop-sites, folks who live in the county are learning what to do with their broken branches. Many say they've just put the mess into piles. The News On 6 anchor Latoya Silmon reports there are services available.

If you live in a Green Country city, chances are you have dropped your debris off at a site or the city has curb side service. But one county man says weeks after the ice storm toppled his trees, he's still in the dark about how to get rid of the eyesore.

"It's really a shame because we had some really beautiful pecan trees in the back that I was really excited about," said Mark Roberts.

The aftermath of the December ice storm lines many of the streets near his home too.

"It's been six or eight weeks now and we're still sawing and cutting, and dragging things around and the pile just keeps getting bigger and bigger," said Roberts.

And while Roberts says he's heard plenty about how neighboring cities are hauling off debris. He has no idea how to get rid of his, but the county says it has a plan.

"We won't go on private property, but we will pick up whatever is in the right of way," said Tulsa County Commissioner Fred Perry.

Perry says unlike the City of Tulsa, the county doesn't have a contractor on the job. It may take a while before county workers clear the way for homeowners.

"It's very important that, uh, that the property owners be patient. It's going to take time. There's a lot of debris out there," said Perry.

The county says it could take until April or May before it gets to everyone.

County residents can also burn their debris, but they have to go through the county health department first to find out all the guidelines.

Powered by Frankly
News On 6
303 N. Boston Ave.
Tulsa, OK 74103
Newson6.com is proud to provide Oklahomans with timely and relevant news and information, sharing the stories, pictures and loves of Oklahomans across our great state.
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2017 KOTV. Oklahoma Traveler™ is a registered trademark of Griffin Communications. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices.