More Vacant Buildings Targeted By City - NewsOn6.com - Tulsa, OK - News, Weather, Video and Sports - KOTV.com |

More Vacant Buildings Targeted By City

Posted: Updated:
The city's new regulations, in some cases, let them fine the owner a very attention-getting $1,000 a day until they bring the building up to code. The city's new regulations, in some cases, let them fine the owner a very attention-getting $1,000 a day until they bring the building up to code.
City of Tulsa Inspector Harold Adair says there are two prime example of vacant buildings right across the street from his office. City of Tulsa Inspector Harold Adair says there are two prime example of vacant buildings right across the street from his office.
They're focusing on downtown at the moment. But the new regulations can be applied anywhere in Tulsa. They're focusing on downtown at the moment. But the new regulations can be applied anywhere in Tulsa.

Last weekend, we explained how a new city ordinance gives officials more power to regulate vacant buildings like the old Tulsa Club, but they're not stopping there.  The News On 6's Steve Berg reports there are about 50 other smaller properties downtown that don't meet code, and they're on notice too.

City of Tulsa Inspector Harold Adair says there are two prime example of vacant buildings right across the street from his office.

The owner of one he says, responded to the city's request immediately.

"They got all the necessary permits to do all the necessary interior renovation.  They put new windows in it.  They're making it a more attractive property," said Adair.  "At the other end of the spectrum are the buildings on 2nd street."

The facade of the building has been torn away, a large pit sits exposed on the floor.  And Adair says the roof is unstable.  He says the city and this building's owner are headed for a hearing

"It's been left in this condition for a number of years that make it a dilapidated, unsafe structure.  These owners have not done anything other than just advertise it for sale," said Adair.

The city's new regulations, in some cases, let them fine the owner a very attention-getting $1,000 a day until they bring the building up to code.  It gives the city more power to get something done with these properties.

Something that Adair, a former police officer, appreciates.

"You can't just abandon it and leave it there and wait for Vision 2025 money or the city to bail you out on it," said Adair.

Adair hopes the code enforcement will actually lead to more preservation than demolition.  He thinks that bringing them up to code will make them more attractive to buyers who would then rehab them the rest of the way.

"Get these buildings fixed.  I mean a lot of them are beautiful old buildings.  And they still have a use and a purpose in the city of Tulsa," said Adair.

They're focusing on downtown at the moment. But the new regulations can be applied anywhere in Tulsa.

Powered by Frankly
News On 6
303 N. Boston Ave.
Tulsa, OK 74103
Newson6.com is proud to provide Oklahomans with timely and relevant news and information, sharing the stories, pictures and loves of Oklahomans across our great state.
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2017 KOTV. Oklahoma Traveler™ is a registered trademark of Griffin Communications. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices.