The snow we got in Tulsa was just enough to cover the grass, but didn't stick to the streets or highways.  News On 6 anchor Lori Fullbright reports around Tulsa Thursday night, there weren't even reports of fender-benders on police scanners.  It was so quiet; the Tulsa Police Department didn't use Operation Slick Streets.

If the situation gets worse overnight or in the morning, they could reinstitute Operation Slick Streets, which means they can't respond to any accident that doesn't involve an injury.

For the folks who spent their day indoors, they were greeted with the task after work of brushing snow off their cars.  It was soft, easy snow that didn't require much elbow grease.  One man finally gave up on the scraper and just used his arm to brush the snow from his car before heading home.

A couple of teenage boys and two little girls were the only ones brave enough to try to sled on the little bit of snow Mother Nature provided them.  They got in a few good runs before the muddy spots started outnumbering the snowy ones.

Once darkness fell, it was all about the effect on streets and roads, but all was calm.  Traffic on I-244 was moving at about usual highway speeds.  There were no reports of cars sliding off streets or roads, no crashes, nothing reckless.

There were a couple of snow plows, out driving the highways, looking for trouble spots that might need their attention.  But, even they seemed to be on standby.

All that good travel news could change as the temperatures drop into the 20's overnight.  The moisture could freeze on the streets and roads and create slick spots.

The same rules apply as always when we get bad weather:  slow down, give yourself a little extra time to get where you're going and put plenty of space between you and the driver in front of you.