By Rick Wells, The News On 6

TULSA, Oklahoma -- All successful people are good at juggling. They juggle meetings, schedules, and projects. We call it, "keeping all the balls in the air."

There are some students at OSU Medical School, however, who have learned real juggling. These medical students will be doctors someday, and juggling will help them get there.

"It's probably the most brain specific exercise I can think of," said Dr. Craig Stevens, PhD., a professor of Pharmacology at OSU Medical School.

Stevens bills himself as an evangelist for juggling.

Rick Wells, The News On 6: "What you're saying is everyone should juggle."
Juggling evangelist Dr. Craig Stevens: "Everyone should juggle, I agree 100 percent."

A group of first year medical students thinks Stevens might have the right idea.

"It does create alertness on some level," said medical student Katie Seikel.

After a juggling session they're more ready to study and able to focus.

Focusing has always been my problem - juggling might be just what the doctor ordered. One ball juggling is where you start.

"One hand to the next hand, very good and back again," said Dr. Stevens. "So you've already completed the first lesson, and you're ready for two ball juggling."

Stevens said the most important thing is the throw, not the catch.

Lauren France and Justin Mitchell have progressed to help juggling, I think it's called.

"I love it I started last week," said Lauren France.

She said it's a great stress reliever and gives her brain a break - and of course scientific - as evidenced by the lab coat.

"As you get to advanced juggling you can get very technical and mathematical and scientific," said Dr. Craig Stevens, PhD.

Mostly, though, it's just fun. And when they've mastered juggling, getting a couple of dozen patients through the door on time every day ought to be a snap.

The T-Town Jugglers, the OSU Medical School juggling club, meets every Tuesday evening from 6:30 to 8:30, in Founders Hall near the bookstore.

Everyone is welcome.