TULSA, Oklahoma - Twenty students and six teachers were killed one year ago in one of the deadliest school shootings in America.

For 26 seconds bells rang in Tulsa for the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown.

"I just want to make sure everyone knows that this isn't an issue that's going away," said Erika Quinn, a member of Moms Demand Action. "You know, we've had 28 shootings since Newtown - and we're not going to be quiet,"

Erika Quinn is an organizer with Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense In America. She feels Saturday's memorial service served as way to start a conversation in the community about gun violence.

"We're not all about gun control," Quinn said. "We're not trying to take anyone's guns; we're just finding out ways that we can work with the gun community to make our children safer."

Across the country the group held their moment of "no more silence."

"There's still not enough being done," Quinn said. "There's still so much of a resistance between those of us who are going for gun sense and the people who are pushing against us."

The Reverend Barbara Prose spoke at Saturday's service and says too many people are affected by gun violence and people need to share their stories with the community.

"We hold the power over life and death in our hands, and it's our responsibility to protect our children," Prose said.

"I think that it's important on both sides of the political spectrum come together to talk about this because we share a reverence for life - we need to overcome our political differences in honor of life," Reverend Prose said.

Pro-gun advocates in Oklahoma say their issue after the school shooting is about making sure law abiding citizens can keep their guns and use them when needed.

"I think just a common sense approach is to make sure that you and I can defend ourselves," said Tim Gillespie, Oklahoma Second Amendment Association. "If we choose to be able to carry a weapon we're able to do that."

Tim Gillespie says Oklahoma lawmakers have protected their rights to carry firearms.

"You having the ability to defend yourself is what's going to make the difference," Gillespie said.

Moms Demand Action says they modeled their group after Mothers Against Drunk Driving.