TULSA, Oklahoma - Tow trucks are racing against time trying to get Green Country drivers un-stuck from Sunday's snowstorm. Several cars lost control when the roads got slick.

Steep hills, like the one at 81 and Yale, can be the most difficult when the roads get covered in ice and snow.

Police are encouraging everyone who still has a car stuck in a ditch to get it out before we get this next round of winter weather. Deserted cars along busy Tulsa streets are a reminder of how a few inches of snow can bring travel to a standstill.

"When I was stuck here I could see just cars piling up behind me down the hill so I just knew they weren't going to be here for a while," said ORU Sophomore Tim Dean.

Dean's car couldn't make it up the hill on his way to church Sunday morning.

"Still thought I could do it; as you can see I was almost there, but it failed on me right at the end," Dean said.

Cars all over the area lost control, spun out and ended up in ditches. Stranded cars still line major Oklahoma Highways.

Kurt Dodd, with the Tulsa Police said, "Get it out as soon as possible."

Tulsa Police said abandoned cars make work harder for the crews trying to keep the roads clear.

"You're packing more snow as they come through with the trucks, they're pushing more snow. You're almost creating a snow drift over there by your car if your car is on the side of the road," Dodd said.

With more snow on the way, Dean said learned his lesson, "If I had to go out, if I absolutely had to go out anywhere in this direction I would take a different route. Maybe go down to Riverside (Drive) where it's nice and flat."

Tulsa Police will be checking stalled cars to make sure no one's inside. Police said cars left in the middle of the street and blocking traffic will get towed immediately.

You'll have 24-hours notice from police to get your car pulled out before a tow truck company hauls it off.

"Try to do your best to stay home if you can," suggested Dodd.

One tow truck company is operating on a four to five hour delay.