TULSA, Oklahoma - Police hope you can help track down the driver who hit a Tulsa bicycle rider then drove off. The impact knocked the woman off her bike at the corner of Utica and 6th Street.

It's is an intersection Crystal Carey rides through regularly. She said a truck floored it and slammed into in her at about 9 p.m. Tuesday and she's certain the driver knew what he'd done.

"They slowed down and I was like, 'Stop. Stop. You hit me,' and then they sped off," Carey said.

It's still a bit of a blur for Carey.

"I was halfway through the intersection when I just remember being on my bike, and then I just remember being in the middle of the intersection screaming," Carey said.

She was riding her bike home from work last Tuesday night when she was hit by a truck. She was headed east on 6th Street, the truck, she said, was making a left turn onto Utica.

Carey said she had taken every safety precaution that a cyclist could.

The light was green, I was going, I had looked, I had a helmet on, have reflective gear, have three bright lights," Carey said.

Carey does have a car, but her bicycle is her main form of transportation. She tries to stay on bike trails as much as possible, but there are some city streets she can't avoid.

But she never thought one of her regular routes would leave her with a metal plate and six screws in her arm.

"Pretty much that big elbow bone right here was just up in the other part of my arm," said Carey.

Carey was hoping she might find a traffic camera on one of the traffic lights at the intersection, but when she didn't find one there, she turned to a dental office across the street and its security camera video. Although grainy, it caught the whole thing on tape.

"I was riding my bike, going right down the street, and I just see myself get flung like a doll," Carey said.

The video shows the truck stopped at the traffic light, then some movement across the street. Next, the truck turns and then Carey's bright lights are on the ground. The truck then pauses and speeds off as if nothing happened.

Carey said the truck was a dark blue, mid-sized late 90s early 2000 model, with a gold decal on the back windshield.

Police ask anyone with information to call Crime Stoppers at 918-596-COPS.

Carey said she plans to get back on her bike in a few weeks, but she won't be riding at night anymore.