CREEK COUNTY, Oklahoma - A woman long believed to be involved in a 1992 triple murder was arrested near Drumright on Friday morning, according to the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation.

Beverly Noe, 67, of Bristow, was taken into custody during a traffic stop, OSBI says.

The Creek County District Attorney's Office is prosecuting the case and has filed three counts of first-degree murder against Noe, according to a probable cause affidavit.

Remains of Wendy Camp, 23, her daughter Cynthia Britto, 6, and Lisa Kregear, 22, were found in a Pawnee County field last April after a missing persons search that began more than two decades ago and garnered national attention.

Noe is Camp's former mother-in-law. The remains were found in an 8-foot grave on land formerly owned by family members, including Noe's brother, Grover Prewitt, 61, who already has been charged.

News On 6 broke the news to Camp's mother and sister after Friday's arrest. Camp's relatives passionately have been lobbying for movement in the 22-year-old case since the remains were uncovered last spring.

"The new arrest is wonderful news," Camp's mother Jackie Taylor said on Friday. "Thank goodness that we're at the point where we're finally moving toward justice after 22 years. I just wish it had happened sooner."

Camp's sister, Aisha Hashmi, told News On 6 that Noe's arrest "should have happened the day they found the bodies. There was no reason to delay it. They were 150 percent sure these people arranged to go pick them up and take them to be murdered. The delay is just hard to understand.

"We're glad Beverly is going to be behind bars, but we won't be satisfied until the whole family, all parties involved, are paying for these crimes."

At the time of the disappearances, the families were in a custody battle involving Camp's son. OSBI says the couple's then-toddler, Jonathan, lived with his father Chad Noe in Shamrock.

Beverly Noe and family matriarch Ida Prewitt were with the group the day they disappeared.

The two women said they offered to pick up Camp, Britto and Kregear in Oklahoma City and drive them Shamrock for visitation with Camp's son. After the visit, Beverly Noe claims she and Ida Prewitt were on their way to take the three back to OKC, but dropped them off at a Walmart in Chandler following an argument in the car.

The victims were never seen or heard from again.

Investigators have said they don't believe the story the women told and never found any evidence they were in Chandler.

Jonathan Noe, now an adult, was raised by grandmother Beverly and still lives with her.

Grover Prewitt has been charged with accessory to first-degree murder and has been free on bond since August 2013. He has pleaded not guilty and is due in court again on May 2.

Grover Prewitt reportedly told agents he filled a hole with dirt in '92, claiming he didn't know it was a grave and didn't look inside the hole for fear of what he'd see, an affidavit says.

Six days after the remains were found, Grover Prewitt said he remembered his mother asking him once to sprinkle black pepper on the area where the hole was filled in, because it would deter dog scents, an affidavit says.

Grover Prewitt also claimed he had distanced himself from his mother and sister, so agents fit him with wires and told him to obtain information about the murders from his family last year. Agents said Grover Prewitt sabotaged the operation twice.

In part of one of the recordings, however, Grover told his sister OSBI was after his guns, to which Beverly reportedly replied: "Well, I don't know whey they'd want the guns when she threw them all in there."

An affidavit filed on Friday says that Grover Prewitt later reported running into his sister at a casino in Bristow in July 2013, and she told him he didn't need to worry about the .357-caliber revolver, because she used someone else's gun "and they cannot tie it to me."

According to the medical examiner's reports released last month, Camp died from sharp-force injuries and gunshot wounds; Kregear died of gunshot wounds to the torso; and Britto's cause of death is undetermined. They all were ruled homicides.

The autopsy reports also revealed that a .357-caliber revolver and two knives also were exhumed from the 8-foot burial site in rural Jennings.

Pawnee County land records show the property where the graves were unearthed was owned by Grover Prewitt in 1992, The Cleveland American first reported last spring. The newspaper said deeds filed with the county clerk show Grover Prewitt and his wife purchased the 40-acre property in 1987. A new deed was filed with his mother's name on it in 1995, three years after the trio was last seen. Beverly Noe's name was added on a later quit claim.

In a 2013 interview with News On 6, Beverly Noe denied involvement in the three murders.

"It's not like I saw them last, because apparently somebody did, because I wasn't the one to put them there," she said. "I didn't do it."

Noe currently is serving a suspended sentence until 2016 for conspiring with her mother to burn down a home and collect insurance money. They both served prison time for the crime.

Creek County court documents say Beverly Noe committed the three murders "in concert with" Ida Prewitt. Ida Prewitt is not around to answer to those claims. She died of cancer in 2011.

In an interview with the state last year, Gary Noe, Beverly's ex-husband, went undercover for authorities. He said his ex-wife always wanted custody of their grandson and said it "wouldn't be a problem if that little b---h (Wendy) wasn't involved," documents show.

Beverly Noe also reportedly told Gary she had gone to church recently and been "saved."

"Gary told her it was not possible to be saved unless you confessed all your sins," the affidavit says. "Beverly said she had confessed all her sins except one, and she would take that to the grave."