TULSA, Oklahoma - Oklahoma has been off to a slow start this severe weather season, but a powerful storm is bringing a threat of severe weather including hail and possibly tornadoes.

Northeastern Oklahoma saw strong winds and warm temperatures on Saturday, and storms stayed west of Interstate 35.

Later in the evening and into Sunday, the storm system combined with a dry line will bring a greater threat of severe storm, News On 6 Meteorologist Mike Grogan said.

The greatest threat for severe storms, including tornadoes, is along and east of the Highway 69 corridor. However, the Tulsa area is still included in the risk for all types of severe weather through mid-afternoon, he said.

Scattered storms may occur early Sunday morning, but as it gets warmer, the threat increases with the possibility of tornadoes, large hail and high winds.

According to the National Weather Service, the most likely time for severe weather is between 1 and 10 p.m. with the areas along and east of Highway 75 being at the greatest risk.

The NWS says, in addition to severe weather, an elevated fire danger is possible for Saturday and Sunday as well due to strong south winds. They say strong winds and low humidity will create conditions to the rapid spread of wildfire if one is started.

Grogan says the biggest uncertainty for eastern Oklahoma is whether or not storms from Saturday night will stabilize the area east of the dry line. He says if that happens, and the rains limit the surface heating, the more intense wave of storms on Sunday afternoon will decrease.

He said despite that uncertainty, the threat for severe weather is significant and tornadoes could be in the mix.