TULSA, Oklahoma - Hundreds of people gathered at Guthrie Green to show their support for a tribe in North Dakota battling the construction of a cross-country pipeline.

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe says the pipeline goes right through sacred tribal grounds, and several people in Oklahoma wanted their voices heard on the subject.

Oklahomans rallied for a tribe 16 hours away in North Dakota Thursday. People from tribes all across the state gathered to protest the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Standing Rock Sioux Tribe supporter, Lynette Blalock-Seward said, "To see all these different people gathering to support the Sioux Tribe is just awe inspiring. It kind of gives you a lump in your throats."

The Standing Rock Sioux says the route goes right through burial grounds, and pipeline protesters are worried about the environmental impact of a pipeline crossing the Missouri River.

For those who can't make it to North Dakota, Guthrie Green was where their voices were heard.

"I felt like this was my opportunity to stand up for what is right, and it's something I've always wanted to do for my people," said Cherokee Nation citizen, Zaccary John.

John said it's the younger generations of natives that need to get involved with their tribes.

"We're the future,” he said. “Our grandparents and our parents have fought and fought and fought for our rights and it's time that we start fighting for our own rights."

Casey Camp-Horinek of the Ponca Nation was one of the many Oklahomans who made the drive to North Dakota to see the standoff.

"And today, we stand with Standing Rock," she said.

Blalock-Seward said, "We are with you. We are all fighting with you."

Friday, a federal judge in Washington will rule on the continued construction of the pipeline. The Standing Rock Sioux asked the judge for an injunction because of the sacred burial sites.