A farrier and sculptor who is also a blacksmith have created a spectacular work of art. The question is, how?

Somehow they turned a pile of old worn out rasps, into something very special.

Holly Fisher is a sculptor and a blacksmith, Olaf Batt is a farrier, pretty good one I hear.

I had seen the photos of the headdress, but i wanted to see how they did it. Lots of heat.

"By the time the metal gets to the temperature we need it to forge it's about 23- to 2,500 degrees," said Holly Fisher, Sculptor.

Once you get it hot enough, you got to get a big hammer.

"You can see there's a lot of trust happening there," Holly said. "It's like dancing with someone with a hammer."

It's ironic, isn't it? Recreating one of nature's most delicate creations takes so much hammering. Those rasps are made of high carbon steel. That's what makes them so hard, so you gotta hit it hard to get the results you want, which is not perfection.

"If it was perfect it wouldn't look natural," said Holly.

They worked weekends for maybe a year and a half making feathers and creating this war bonnet made of steel. Lots of heat, lots of  hammering and Olaf says lots of horses.

"About a thousand plus horses that were touched by the rasps that we used," Olaf said.

What a Spectacular first time project for this partnership. They've already sold this work of art even before they finished it.