OKLAHOMA CITY, Oklahoma - The Oklahoma Supreme Court decided Thursday the state Motor Vehicle Tax is constitutional.

The justice's decision today means it's still going to cost more to buy a car in the state of Oklahoma. 

The Oklahoma Supreme Court voted 5-4 Thursday that a 1.23% tax is still going to be added to the cost of buying a vehicle. 

The tax is expected to bring in about 124 million dollars to the state.

Governor Mary Fallin says she was pleased with the justice's decision but says the state is still dealing with a $500 million budget gap from the strike down of the cigarette tax. 

"I hope that everybody realizes that these are serious issues that has an effect on the lives of our fellow Oklahomans … It's important that we find a way to come together as republicans and democrats and find a way forward for our state." Fallin said. 

The May 2017 bill was initially brought to the state's supreme court because members of The Oklahoma Automobile Dealers Association alleged the bill violated constitutional guidelines.

They say it was adopted during the final week of the 2017 legislative session and it didn't receive 75 percent of the votes in both houses.

The governor said today she will be having a special session to discuss ways to increase revenue for the state.