OKLAHOMA CITY, Oklahoma - Several Green Country educators met with lawmakers inside the Capitol Wednesday and said they had productive conversations.

The teachers are hopeful that they will be able to reach a solution together soon.

"I have 52 wonderful students and they deserve more than what they are getting," said Jenks teacher Emily Copsey.

Copsey said she used to have 19 students in her classes when she attended Jenks, but it's a much different story for her students now.

"My kids don't know any different so they're used to it, but I do. And I know what I got is not what they're getting," she said.

Copsey, her coworkers and one of her students walked around talking with lawmakers about the issues they're facing and how the additional funds could help them.

But sometimes they have to wait two hours for them to have time to listen.

“It's what I'm here for and I'm positive that this will make a difference, even if it's a small one. It's a start,” Copsey said.

The Jenks teachers had a chance to meet with Representative Scott McEachin Wednesday and talked with Senator Gary Stanislawski Tuesday, but they wish they could say more.

“I am so glad they've come down to have some good dialogue with us. Throughout the day we have anywhere from four to five teachers to 15,” Stanislawski said.

“He did give us 20 minutes of his time. He was very gracious with that. But I wish I was able to share more of my stories,” Copsey said.

Because the House got a late start Wednesday, some lawmakers weren't in their offices, so teachers had to take a different approach.

"We're emailing them and asking them for their yes vote and just waiting for some to get here so we can start talking to them in person," said Dewey teacher Patricia Fouts.

Teachers believe through sharing their stories they may get some of the no votes to switch to yes.

"I tell them if you want to have a nice chair for your desk then why can't my students? Why do my students have to have history books that still have George W. Bush as the president," Harrah teacher Allison Crowder said.

Many of the teachers said they will be at the Capitol until a solution is reached.