TULSA, Oklahoma - As dangerously high temperatures continue, the Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office is increasing enforcement to make sure animals left outside are properly taken care of.

Deputies say they are taking more precautions in these extreme temperatures.

Whether it’s really hot in the summer or below freezing in the winter, deputies aren’t taking any chances.

“When you get to these extreme heats and extreme colds, the ability for a situation to go from good to bad in that time span shortens,” said Deputy Dakota Crase.

Crase says he and other members of the department are stepping up enforcement this summer, making sure animals are not malnourished or suffering.

“We do take precautions in the summer months,” he said.  “And the extreme winters, just because it’s so easy for animals and people alike to slip in those conditions.”

He says the number of animal welfare calls also go up when it get really hot or really cold.

Cameron Kirk of the Humane Society of Tulsa says leaving your dog or cat outside in these temperatures is a big problem.

“It’s a huge issue, especially in Oklahoma because it just gets so hot in the dry heat there’s not really any way for the animals to cool down,” said Kirk.

It’s not just cats and dogs the Sheriff’s Office is checking on.

“We get a little bit of everything.  It’s not uncommon for us to go on horse calls or any type of cattle or livestock calls,” stated Crase.

The Sheriff’s Office also has two designated animal control deputies, but any deputy can write tickets for animal cruelty.

“We get the calls and we’ll go check them out and investigate them,” said Crase.  “If there’s something that needs to be done, we act on it.”

Deputies say if you believe an animal is suffering, you can call their non-emergency number.