As the Notre Dame Cathedral burned in Paris, Catholics nearly 5,000 miles away reacted to the fire. 

"It's deeply spiritual and to happen at Easter time during Holy Week, that makes it all the more poignant,” Marquette Catholic School teacher Belinda Fricker said.

 Christ the King employee Pius Devasahayam said his daughter has a trip planned to Paris next month.

"I told her to make the trip,” he said. “There are other places she can see in Paris and maybe see the monument itself, the way it is now. Go into the church, say a prayer."

The nearly 900-year-old cathedral was undergoing a multi-million-dollar renovation when the fire took over the Paris landmark Monday.

"It's very upsetting, I'm sure because Parisians value their history and culture so much,” Fricker said.

The French Alliance of Tulsa released a statement, saying in part:

"We at the Alliance are stunned to contemplate that a structure that took almost two hundred years to build and that has survived so much of European history, including two world wars, could be brought down in such a short time.  This is a staggering loss, not only to Paris and the French nation but to world civilization."

"We can all be supportive of them and be praying for them now,” Fricker said.

The French Alliance said it is working with the national alliance in D.C. to figure out how Tulsans can be a part of any recovery efforts.

Below is the full statement from the president of the alliance, Nan Melton:

“We at the Alliance are stunned to contemplate that a structure that took almost two hundred years to build and that has survived so much of European history, including two world wars, could be brought down in such a short time.  This is a staggering loss, not only to Paris and the French nation but to world civilization. 

We are now heartbroken and feeling helpless as we view the destruction.  However, I have contacted the National Federation of Alliances Francaises in Washington, DC, in anticipation of a coordinated response, and we'll be in touch with the head organization in Paris to see how we can become part of a recovery.  What we need to hold on to is the motto of Paris, dating back to at least 1358, the Latin Fluctuat nec mergitur.  The metaphor is of Paris as a ship, which is tossed about by the waves but never sinks. We remain in solidarity with the people of France to play our part to restore this glorious world treasure.  We have to believe - and to act.”