WEBBERS FALLS, Oklahoma - People in the town of Webbers Falls are getting a first-hand look at the devastation left behind by the flood waters. No one is actually living in town yet, but they are allowed to go there between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. to clean their homes.

Town officials say people aren’t allowed to stay in town yet because most houses don’t have running water and some don’t have electricity.

Also, most of their sewer pumps were underwater. But one problem the town is not having trouble with is finding volunteers willing to come in and help.

“We were in Colorado when we heard it was being evacuated so I drove overnight to get here,” said Stanley Whisman.

Stanley Whisman and his wife have owned their home in Webber’s falls for 4 years. He says this was their winter home until they moved here full time in April.

They only lived there for three weeks before the flood hit. Now almost everything in their home isn’t salvageable.

“Basically everything’s lost,” said Whisman. “We are thinking bulldozer right now.”

Whisman says he was able to grab what could fit in his car and had to leave the rest. He said he moved some items to higher ground, but the water level got so high that things were physically floating.

“It looked like a hand grenade went off in here when I opened the door because things were just scattered everywhere,” said Whisman.

The water pressure also got so high, it shattered their glass shower door.

“That was a really nice shower at one time,” said Whisman.

And many appliances, like their refrigerator, need to be thrown away. But thanks to local volunteers, they didn’t have to remove the items on their own.

“We were at the point where we needed to get the refrigerator out and I just couldn’t do it,” said Whisman.

“We’ve been to places where people had everything out of their home to places where people didn’t have anything out,” said Oasis Church Pastor Rodney Mattox.

Oasis Pastor Rodney Mattox says their Muskogee church was badly damaged in a tornado back in 2017, so they understand what many of these people are going through.

“The church has been able to say this is who we are and this is what we are here for. In the midst of everybody’s turmoil, we are here to help,” said Mattox.

They are also here to pray with those like the Whismans, who lost everything.

Mattox started a Facebook group called Muskogee County Pastors. The group is filled with church congregations willing to help those in need. Mattox says you can message the page or post a comment and they will connect you with a church that can help.

Right now, the Whismans are living in an RV and they say they aren’t sure where their next move will be.

“We’ll see what happens next. That’s all we can do,” said Whisman.

The Mayor says they are continuing to post updates on their Facebook Page on when people will be able to go back home. They are also sending alerts through their automated messaging system for those who pay for water in Webbers Falls.

In the meantime, Red Cross is there providing meals twice a day and there are plenty of churches like Oasis with volunteers out assisting.

Some organizations in Gore are also providing assistance. Short Stop is collecting donations like clothing, furniture, household items, toiletries, food, etc.

Cornerstone Church on 8th street in Gore also has cleaning supplies available for families.