Boaters are gearing up for one of the busiest weekends of the year at Oklahoma Lakes, but recent flooding has added dangers.

Jaime Wheeler and his son Carter are getting the boat ready for the Fourth of July.

"As with anything like roadways or air traffic, or whatever, when you increase the numbers of people you increase the potential for accidents," Wheeler said.

Wheeler grew up at Keystone and has seen first-hand how flooding can change the lake.

“There's places up on the end of the river where I used to water ski and there's now 15-foot trees growing, so as the floods come through, the rains, it just changes the features of the lake," Wheeler said

Pier 51 General Manager Sean Adair calls this his "Super Bowl" weekend.

He said along with hidden debris below the surface bad choices on the water, like drinking and boating can have life-ending consequences.

"It can just add danger to a moment out in the water. One minute you could be having fun which is what we've witnessed out here the past few years. We had some customers have a Seadoo accident and lost their lives," said Adair.

Regulars like Sean and Jamie say boaters can avoid most problems by staying in the main part of the lake.

“Just use common sense. Now of course around the shoreline there's concrete picnic tables all around this lake from certain parts. Just use your common sense. Don't come into a shore area or beach area fast. Just slow down," Adair said.

Wheeler knows teaching safety to the next generation is important too.

"When he was growing up I wore a life jacket every day, so he would for a long time. That's the main thing. Make sure you have all your stuff working," Wheeler said

Oklahoma Highway Patrol urges those on the water to wear their life jackets and have the proper safety equipment with them.