SKIATOOK, Oklahoma - The historic flood this year is keeping beekeepers busy as they make adjustments to their hives. One of those business owners said some hives have been all but destroyed.

It's a big business with a big impact on Green Country, that goes beyond just producing honey. Flood waters ruined homes and destroyed property. They also ruined businesses and people's livelihoods.

In fact, many beekeepers across the state were impacted by flooding. Some standing knee deep in flood water just to try and save their hives.

"Some hives literally floated away completely and were not found,” Skiatook Bee Supply’s Kimberley Stowell. 

Stowell turned her passion of beekeeping into a company where she sells beeswax and honey from her own hives and helps to teach and mentor others.

"I love having little products from the hive because the bees are providing a little bit of everything there,” said Stowell.

She didn't lose any of her hives to flood waters but she said she helped many of her students who did. Now she helping guide them through some of the obstacles that came along with the receding waters like ants taking over hives and issues with queen rearing.

"Our concern is that that honey, because of the high humidity, that we have has a lot of moisture content and moisture content in honey can cause that honey to go bad,” said Stowell. 

There are set backs because of the flood waters but Stowell said those obstacles are nothing beekeepers can't adapt to if they stay attentive to their hives. It's a pretty sweet deal overall, she said. 

"It's sweet for the honey and it's sweet because you know you're doing something good for the environment and good for mankind in general really,” said Stowell. 

Learn more about Skiatook Bee Supply here