TULSA, Oklahoma - As Hurricane Dorian continues to wreak havoc out at the Atlantic Ocean, first responders from Green Country say they're ready for whatever blows their way.

The National Weather Service said Hurricane Dorian is the second most powerful Atlantic hurricane on record. Oklahomans are using their own force, to make sure people stay safe.

Terry Sivadon and the crew of Oklahoma Task Force one are dealing with uncharted territory: a powerful Category Four force of nature.

"This will be our first time to experience this," he said. "Usually we're coming in after the fact. Now we're gonna watch this hit."

Sivadon and 70 others arrived at the Orlando Convention center from Oklahoma Sunday. They have search and rescue equipment, four boats for swift and high water rescue, and search dogs.

 "For Oklahoma to be here in Florida, we've never done that before. This is as far as we've ever traveled," Sivadon said.

He said although it's unfamiliar, he hopes Oklahoma weather has given them some preparation. 

"We've got tornadoes in Oklahoma, I've rode those out my whole life, but this may be a different deal," he said. "I'm kind of anxious."

They're not the only Oklahomans in the eye of the storm.

Crews from the Oklahoma Red Cross left this afternoon, and OU research scientists set up a mobile radar to gather hurricane data near Titusville, Florida. Several students went along to see the storm first-hand.

All showing Oklahomans will certainly step up in the face of disaster.

"They're really prepared," Sivadon said. "I think we'll be fine, I hope it doesn't turn as bad as they think."

The National Weather Service says the storm will likely stay in the Bahamas Monday night, and winds and rain are likely to impact Florida, Georgia and the Carolinas.

Oklahomans said they'll be there to help as long as it takes.