ROGERS COUNTY, Oklahoma - A Talala war veteran is sharing his story about working on top of one of the World Trade Center towers for weeks, helping install a 360-foot antenna.

83-year-old Korean War Veteran Bob Moore spent much of his life towering above major cities as an iron worker and welder. One building he remembers working on vividly is the North Tower back in the 70s. 

"I saw it on the news when they flew into the tower, I was sitting right here," Moore said.

Moore remembers the 9/11 attacks vividly. The Navy veteran had a very different perspective of the twin towers as they fell under attack.

"I thought, my God, I didn't think it would catch on fire, since there's a lot of iron in that thing," Moore said. 

Moore has topped skyscrapers at major cities across the U.S. as a welder. It's a trade he learned in the military during his four years serving in the Korean War in the 50s.

 "They taught me welding," he said.

In the 1970s, Moore and other iron workers were assigned to install the 360 foot antenna for New York television transmission atop the north tower. 

Moore said the men would sit on beams more than a thousand feet above ground and worked long days for several weeks to get the job done.

"You got paid for 10 hours, and really were working 14, 15 hours before you could get home to shower and eat," he said. 

Once complete, the north tower was about 1700 feet tall including the antenna.

He says looking back on the building he helped create, after it was destroyed, is tough.

"They lost a lot of people, and the kinfolk have to suffer now," Moore said.

Moore said despite a lack of safety equipment, and being more than a thousand feet above ground every day, he was never scared.