TULSA, Oklahoma - An advocacy group is working to bring more awareness about education in Oklahoma.

They want to know what parents believe is working and still needs improvement - a year and a half after the teacher walkout.

The Oklahoma Parent Legislative Action Committee is asking parents to take an online survey about issues pertaining to the classroom because they want to make lawmakers aware of the ongoing issues still happening in Oklahoma classrooms.

“Parents, teachers, we're all custodians of our children’s future so we should all participate, we should all be interested in making sure they have the best opportunity possible,” said co-founder of the Tulsa Parent Legislative Action Committee, JJ Burnam.

JJ Burnam is the co-founder of the Tulsa PLAC and has children in the public-school system.              

He says he's thankful the walkout ended with a teacher pay raise, but says Oklahoma classrooms still face persisting problems.

"Parents were relieved that the legislature acted after ten years, but we still see large class sizes and we still see teachers fleeing to other states,” said Burnam.

The survey asks questions about class sizes, certified teachers and what factors help define a quality education.

"We need to know how our policy affects the people who live, work and die here in Oklahoma, and that’s why it's really important that we hear from you,” said House District 77 Representative John Waldron.

Representative John Waldron taught at Booker T High School for several years before heading to the capitol.

He says even though he has his own personal stories to share, it helps to have more feedback to bring forward.

“As a teacher I found that my most important resource wasn’t a computer or textbooks, it was the students themselves because the students could tell me what they needed and then it was my job to provide them what they needed and I think that’s the same for our leadership in Oklahoma City,” said Representative Waldron.

The Oklahoma PLAC says the survey isn't just for parents, it’s for anyone who believes in bettering public education.

"Our school system doesn't just exist to educate children, it’s there to serve our society, it's a measure of what kind of future we want,” said Representative Waldron.

The deadline to complete the survey is October 15th.

To take the survey, click here