TULSA, Oklahoma - The Drug Enforcement Administration will accept vaping devices and cartridges as part of national drug take-back day on Saturday.

The DEA said more than 11 million pounds of prescription medications have been collected over the years.

After numerous deaths and injuries across the US, vaping products are now being collected. This is National Drug Take Back Day, an anonymous way to turn in unused expired or unwanted prescriptions.

New this year the DEA is now accepting vaping devices and cartridges

"It's an emerging public health threat to our youth. You are seeing a lot of kids who are getting on board with this vaping and what goes from the tobacco often times then leads to the vaping of THC products," said Assistant Special Agent in Charge John Scott of the Oklahoma DEA.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said as of October 15th, nearly 1500 lung injury cases associated with vaping or using e-cigarettes have been reported in 49 states, Washington D.C. and 1 U.S. Territory. The CDC said 33 people have died in 24 states.

In Oklahoma, there have been four lung injuries associated with vaping.

"One thing that was very common among all of those injuries and deaths was the use of vaping cartridges to smoke and inhale THC based," said Scott

The CDC said right now they do not know the specific cause of the lung injuries. The DEA says the drug take back day is a way to keep you and your family safe.

"There is nobody looking over your shoulder to see or asking you questions where did you get it,” said Assistant Special Agent in Charge Scott. 

Safely dispose of any unwanted drugs.

"Don't be afraid that you are going to get into trouble for holding onto these opioids or having something that you shouldn't. Bring it in drop it off no questions asked we take care of the disposal," said Scott.

Of course one of those drug take back locations will be here in the News On 6 parking lot at 303 North Boston Avenue on Saturday.

In a press release the DEA said they cannot accept “devices containing lithium ion batteries." 

For more information, click here.