SAPULPA, Oklahoma - The Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation is looking into an officer-involved shooting in Sapulpa.

Police say the incident took place at the South Heights Cemetary. Officers say they may never know what brought Michael Collins to the cemetery, but said he told someone who works at the next cemetery over, Green Hill, that he wanted to die.

Sapulpa Police say one officer responded to the call and started talking to Collins. Police say Collins started coming toward the officer and showed his knife to him. When the officer backed up, police say Collins moved aggressively toward the officer. That's when police say the officer shot Collins once in the chest.

Collins went to the hospital, where he later died.

"Said that he was wanting to die. He even made the comment that he wanted to die by cop. Unfortunately, we do have to answer those calls," said Sapulpa Capt. Glenn Coffey.

Sapulpa Police say the officer who responded did not have a body camera. That's because police say it broke a few days ago and they didn't have one ready to replace it with. 

The OSBI is investigating and will turn its report over to the Creek County District Attorney's Office. The DA will determine if the shooting was justified. 

"It's not really fair to our law enforcement people to ask them to respond to these complex, mental health-related calls without lots of training around that," Mental Health Association Oklahoma CEO Mike Brose said. Brose said he is also a licensed clinical social worker. 

The association works to train organizations and individuals on what it calls "QPR," a tool people can use if they think someone they know might be suicidal.? That stands for ?QUESTION, ?PERSUADE, ?REFER ?

"People are afraid of that question. Are you thinking about hurting yourself, or killing yourself?"? Brose said. 

Brose said anyone who wants to learn how to ask someone that difficult question, can be trained in about an hour and it's free. ?

This is a developing story; stay with News On 6 for updates.