Tulsa Police Starting To Impound Uninsured Vehicles


Sunday, November 7th 2010, 10:59 pm
By: News On 6


Chris Wright, News On Six

TULSA, Oklahoma -- It did not take Tulsa police long to begin enforcing a new state law. Uninsured drivers who are pulled over can now have their cars towed and impounded.

Tulsa police have already towed six cars--about one ever day--since the law went into effect.

06/24/2010 Related Story: Governor Brad Henry Signs Bill To Impound Uninsured Vehicles

They say driving without insurance now has stiffer consequences than simply a small fine.

Officer Adam Dawson says he deals with uninsured drivers on a daily basis.

"If I towed every car that I stopped where they didn't have valid insurance, I'd be towing at least every other car I stopped," Dawson said.

He can now impound those cars if we wants to. A new law that went into effect November 1 allows him to tow uninsured drivers' cars.

Dawson has yet to have anyone towed, but other officers have. Six cars were impounded in the law's first week of existence.

"The case now, the scenario now, if you get stopped, your vehicle can be towed. That's something to think about because maybe you're on your way to that wedding, or on your way to work," said Tulsa Police Officer Leland Ashley.

TPD hopes drivers who don't take insurance seriously will now. Besides the fine, you will now face towing and impounding fees, and could find yourself stuck somewhere on the side of the road.

"It's not our obligation to find you a way home or find you a way to work. So that's another burden you're going to have to worry about," Leland said.

While Officer Dawson promises not to tow every car he stops, he says the new law will make his job a little easier.

"If somebody doesn't have insurance, but you're pretty confident that there's criminal activity afoot, it's just another tool we can use to get that car off the street," he said.

Other new traffic laws include putting limits on teens using cell phones while driving, and allowing bicyclists and motorcyclists to run red lights in certain situations.