Tulsa County Sheriff Launches Campaign On Meth


Tuesday, April 7th 2009, 10:33 pm
By: News On 6


By Jennifer Loren, The News On 6

TULSA, OK - Tulsa County Sheriff's deputies hit the streets to raise awareness about a new surge of meth.  Meth users call it shake and bake and the recipe calls for a few everyday household ingredients.  That's why deputies are asking local store employees to be their eyes and ears as a new fight against meth gets underway.

Tulsa County Sheriffs deputies are taking a first step in the renewed fight against meth.

"This is a picture of the what they call the shake and bake method they're using now," said Tulsa County Sheriff's Deputy Joe Walker.

The fliers show store employees exactly what to look for in their customers' baskets that could be used in a recipe for meth.  The store manager at a Reasor's says he'll talk with his employees about it, just like he did about five years ago when the first fight against meth began.

"I know what a problem this has been in the past. I know we made big strides there for a while it seems like," said Karl Schroeder with Reasor's.

But, this time the items are even more common.  Things like ice packs, drain opener, batteries and a two-liter bottle can be used to cook shake and bake meth.

"But, they are just common things that people come in and buy. So, it is something that we'll have to do a little bit of training here in the store to be on the lookout for those things," said Reasor's Karl Schroeder.

"Get a description of them, possibly a tag number and call your law enforcement," said Tulsa County Sheriff's Deputy Joe Walker.

Deputies aren't wasting any time getting the word out.  After six meth-related fires in Tulsa last month and three people dead as a result, they say it's clear shake and bake meth is a problem and an explosive one.

Deputies say meth lab explosions are more likely to happen with this new shake and bake method because users put all those chemicals into 2-liter bottles.

When they shake the bottles, they're supposed to let pressure out at certain times as it heats up.  When they don't do it exactly right, the bottles explode.

See a copy of the flier.