The Nation's Weather For Thursday


Friday, September 7th 2007, 7:21 am
By: News On 6


WEATHER EXTREMES FOR THURSDAY:

HIGHEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F)...........107 Imperial, CA

HIGHEST HEAT INDEX (DEGREES F)............111 Alva, OK

LOWEST TEMPERATURE (DEGREES F).............33 Houlton, ME

LOWEST WIND CHILL (DEGREES F)..............31 La Veta Pass, CO

HIGHEST WIND GUST (MPH)....................53 Clinton, OK

HIGHEST PRECIPITATION (INCHES)..............4.70 Eveleth, MN

NATIONAL WEATHER SUMMARY

In the East, isolated showers and thunderstorms pushed across portions of New England during the first half of the day. Rainfall amounts were generally light. Farther west, isolated showers and thunderstorms stretched from the Great Lakes, through the eastern Ohio and Tennessee Valleys, and into the Gulf Coast states and southern Florida. No severe weather was reported with these storms, and rainfall rates were light into the evening hours. To the east, a few isolated showers crossed northern Maine. Conditions in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Carolinas, Appalachians, and the Southeast were dry with partly cloudy skies.

In the central portion of the country, scattered showers and thunderstorms impacted much of the Northern Plains, Minnesota, Midwest, and the Upper and Middle Mississippi Valley. During the afternoon hours, areas of flash flooding, severe thunderstorms, and an isolated tornado were reported in portions of Iowa, Missouri, and northern Kansas. Elsewhere, isolated showers and thunderstorms impacted portions of northern and eastern Texas as well as the Lower Mississippi Valley. Isolated severe thunderstorms formed in the Panhandle of Texas.

In the West, scattered showers and thunderstorms stretched across Arizona and New Mexico. Additional showers and thunderstorms were reported across the Northern and Central High Plains. Severe thunderstorms developed in eastern Colorado during the late afternoon. Mostly cloudy skies were observed in the Rockies, with clear to partly cloudy skies in the Pacific Northwest and the Great Basin.

ON THIS DATE IN HISTORY

In 1888, a killing frost impacted New England. Millions of dollars in damage to crops were reported in Maine alone.

In 1930, a storm of baseball-sized hail fell in a 60 mile path from Beresford, South Dakota to Oto, Iowa. Many small farm animals were killed and some hail stones remained on the ground for up to four days.

In 1970, a lightning bolt struck a football field in St. Petersburg, Florida killing 2 people and injuring 22 others. Also, 4 coaches and 38 players were knocked to their feet as a result of the strike.

FRONTS ACROSS THE NATION

A cold front reaches across Minnesota, northwestern Iowa, Nebraska, northwestern Kansas, Colorado, and southern Utah.

A cold front stretches across Montana.

NATIONAL WEATHER FORECAST

In the East, a low pressure system will produce mostly cloudy skies with showers and thunderstorms across the Great Lakes region, the Ohio Valley, and western portions of both the Tennessee Valley and the Southeast. A few strong thunderstorms will be capable of producing frequent lightning, strong winds, sizable hail, and heavy downpours. Rainfall amounts of up to an inch will be possible. Elsewhere, partly cloudy skies and the chance for isolated thunderstorms can be expected across southern Florida. No severe weather is expected and rainfall amounts should remain light. Otherwise, fair skies and dry conditions will prevail throughout the Northeast, the Mid-Atlantic region, eastern portions of both the Tennessee Valley and the Southeast, and much of Florida. High temperatures will reach into the upper 70s to the lower 90s.

Across the central part of the country, a cold front will produce scattered showers and thunderstorms across the Mississippi Valley and into northern sections of the southern Plains. The main concern with this activity will be areas of flooding as locally heavy rainfall amounts of one to two inches will be possible. Otherwise, expect fair skies and dry conditions through the northern and central Plains, and the southern half of Texas. High temperatures will reach into the 70s and the mid 80s across the northern and central Plains, and the Upper and Middle Mississippi Valley; and into the mid 80s and 90s through the southern Plains and the Lower Mississippi Valley.

In the West, an upper-level disturbance will produce mostly cloudy skies with scattered showers and thunderstorms across the southern high Plains, the southern Rocky Mountains, and the Desert Southwest. Rainfall amounts of one to two inches will be possible and will likely lead to areas of flash flooding. Elsewhere, a low pressure system will bring the chance for showers and thunderstorms to the northern high Plains. A few strong storms could produce gusty winds and small hail. Rainfall amounts of a quarter of an inch will be possible. Otherwise, fair skies and dry conditions will prevail throughout the central high Plains, the northern and central Rocky Mountains, the Great Basin, California, and the Pacific Northwest. High temperatures will reach into the 60s and 70s along the coastal regions of both the Pacific Northwest and California; into the 70s and 80s through the northern and central high Plains, the Rocky Mountains, the Great Basin, and much of the Pacific Northwest; and into the 90s to the lower 100s through the southern high Plains, the Desert Southwest, and much of interior California.

Prepared by WeatherBank, Inc.