Claremore Boy Recovering After Being Dragged By Horse


Sunday, July 30th 2000, 12:00 am
By: News On 6


It’s will be a long road to recovery for Claremore resident Corie Inman.

A horse dragged him and critically injured him a week and a half ago.

Now, every new movement is a celebrated achievement, an answer to prayer.

"When they first called me to tell me he was injured, I thought oh, great, what has he done now," says Tami Inman, Cory’s mother. “I got another phone call, it was a nurse, she said they needed consent for LifeFlight."
And I just kind of stopped and thought, LifeFlight, that means your kids about to die. It didn't look like my kid. He was so messed up, the whole side of his face was just beaten."

On July 19th, 11-year-old Corie Inman was riding horses at his mother's boyfriend's ranch in Wagoner County. He was walking a Shetland pony, which is about waist high.

After Corie tied the reins around his waist, the other horses started to run. The pony took off and dragged Corie for 100 yards.

Nobody knows whether Cory will be the same again.

Now, hearing about any little movement is a huge step for Corie Inman's mother, Tami.

"Everything he does to me is a major thing. It's just that much closer to improving," says Inman.

Therapists at the St Francis pediatric intensive care unit won't stop until he is better. They've seen other patients recover from similar brain injuries.

Corie has two sisters and a brother, mom's also busy with them, so this day she missed Corie's latest feat.

"He picked it up with both hands and threw it, he gave me five," says Corie’s therapist. “He did great."

Cory recently smiled for the first time since the accident.

And, Sunday, his Mom was proud to tell us he ate his first bowl of cereal.

Tami would do anything to go back to just before July 19th's accident. Nobody saw Corie tie the reins.

The previous weekend, they stopped his little brother from doing the same thing.

But she knows you can't protect your children at all times but you can always pray that they be protected, so one day he can ride again.