Tulsa Woman Pleads Guilty To Federal Mail Theft Charges


Friday, August 28th 2020, 9:25 pm
By: News On 6


TULSA, Okla. -

A woman pleads guilty to federal mail theft charges after postal inspectors said she broke into several mailboxes at a Tulsa post office.

Victims said those charges are just the start of Hillary Ginn's crimes.

Hillary Ginn pleaded guilty to the federal mail theft charges and still has state charges pending. Some of her many victims said it's a relief.

Krissa Shockley said she caught Hillary Ginn in action last May. She said a package for her daughter never came, so she checked her doorbell video camera.

"Somebody, a woman I didn't know, came up to my porch and took it out of my mailbox," Shockley said.

Shockley posted that video on Facebook, and many of her neighbors told her they had mail stolen too.

"She had taken from a lot of people,” Shockley said. “At that time period, I was the only one that had video proof.”

A few months later, people using the Sheridan Station post office at 51st and Sheridan told us they were repeat victims of mail theft as well.

Terry Tucker, one of the victims, said his P.O. box was broken in to six times starting last May.

Right after our story aired in September, the post office started locking the doors at night, and Tucker said the crimes stopped.

"Ultimately, she was identified breaking into these mailboxes and stealing mail," said U.S. Postal Inspector Paul Ecker. 

Ginn took a plea in federal court this week for six counts each of mail theft and destruction of letter boxes and mail tied to the Sheridan Station crimes.

She also has several charges pending in Tulsa County for petit larceny and larceny of a building.

Ecker has a message for anyone thinking of committing a similar crime.

"Thanks to the U.S. Attorney's Office and their cooperation, we will find you, we will prosecute you, and have justice," he said.

"I really really pray she has learned a lesson," Shockley said. 

A federal judge will sentence Ginn in November. The U.S. Attorney's office is recommending five years’ probation.