It's what makes this country green, the trees.  Thousands have been lost since the ice storm.  The News On 6's Dan Bewley reports volunteers hit the city parks on Saturday with the goal to Re-Green Tulsa.

Many of the trees being planted are replacing those lost in the December ice storm. It's just one of several projects throughout the city as the parks continue to recover.

With shovels in hand, trees on the standby, face-to-face with a March cold snap, 64 trees found a new home in Maxwell Park. Organizers call it the start of Green season.

"We can't miss a day of planting, we have so much to get in the ground," said Anna America, Up With Trees.

Up With Trees says volunteers make it happen.  Volunteers like Bob Burlingame.

"We want more trees in Tulsa. We lost a lot this winter so we're going to plant a bunch more this spring," said Bob Burlingame. "We all have to some work to give back to the community and this is one project that I enjoy doing."

Professional tree trimmers from Michigan, who have made Tulsa a second home, continue to work their magic in the treetops.

"I've been here since the day after the storm occurred," said Kris Beard.

Detroit-based KMB Tree Service isn't charging the city a dime for Saturday's climb. The company says it's already made enough money working Green Country since the ice storm.

"Things aren't all about money, this is about helping out and just doing a good service," said Beard.

At more than $1,000 a pop and the busiest time of the year for Woodward Park on the doorstep, the city couldn't be more thrilled.

"We've got a wedding here next Saturday so that's one of our priorities," said Maureen Turner, Tulsa City Horticulturist.

Some of the trees at Maxwell Park are set to replace others removed after the ice storm, but most are part of Re-Green Tulsa, a city project to plant 20,000 trees in two years.

"This will become a better part of this community and this neighborhood because of the trees," said Anna America.

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