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Could H1N1 Vaccine Lead To Paralysis?

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The Centers for Disease Control has assured the public that the vaccine is safe. They expect it to act just like the seasonal flu vaccine that millions of people get every year without any problems. The Centers for Disease Control has assured the public that the vaccine is safe. They expect it to act just like the seasonal flu vaccine that millions of people get every year without any problems.

By Ashli Sims, The News On 6

TULSA COUNTY -- The government says it could be another month before everyone wanting the H1N1 vaccine can get one.

Long lines have been the norm in cities all over the country for people wanting to get the immunization and many of the people allowed to get the shot or spray now are considered high risk. Health officials say it will be mid-November before there will be enough supplies for everyone to get the vaccine.

Officials at the Tulsa City-County Health Department are expecting about 10,000 more doses of swine flu vaccine. They'll be offered to school children and other high-risk groups.

Health officials say educators need to contact them to set up vaccination clinics. But the push to get vaccinated is being met with a serious dose of skepticism and fear.

Some are concerned the H1N1 vaccine could be more dangerous than the flu itself.

One viewer asked The News On 6 if the vaccine can cause a serious illness that leads to paralysis.

The viewer says she was advised against getting the H1N1 vaccine because there's a chance of getting Guillain Barre syndrome, a disease that attacks the protective coating around the nerves. Basically, it causes progressive paralysis.

The viewer says when the vaccine was given in the 1970s more people got Guillain Barre from the vaccine than actually got sick from the flu. She has a five-year-old son and she says she's scared to get him the shot and scared not to get it for him.

The Centers for Disease Control has assured the public that the vaccine is safe. They expect it to act just like the seasonal flu vaccine that millions of people get every year without any problems.

The CDC does want to assure the public that they are keeping an eye out for any side effects associated with the vaccine.

Guillain Barre is pretty rare, affecting only about one or two people in every 100,000.

In 1976 there were several cases of Guillain Barre diagnosed after patients received the flu shot and it's been the subject of numerous studies.

The CDC reports most found no association, but there are two exceptions that found the vaccine may have increased the risk slightly. That's still just one in a million.

10/13/2009  Related Story: Tulsa 4-Year-Old Dies From H1N1 Complications

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