Tulsa Schools Trying To Save The Lost Art Of Cursive Writing - NewsOn6.com - Tulsa, OK - News, Weather, Video and Sports - KOTV.com |

Tulsa Schools Trying To Save The Lost Art Of Cursive Writing

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Most teenage boys and girls are attached to texting Most teenage boys and girls are attached to texting
Some students say the art of writing isn't just lost on them. Some students say the art of writing isn't just lost on them.
A Tulsa teacher says cursive writing could actually improve brain function. A Tulsa teacher says cursive writing could actually improve brain function.

By Latoya Silmon, The News On 6

TULSA, OK -- Most of us are using cell phone technology and many rely on cell phones every day to communicate.  But texting from a cell phone is testing the patience of some school teachers. 

Some teachers say children today have lost the art of cursive writing, spelling and grammar basics. Chances are your kid has a cell phone with texting capability. 

"My phone is pretty much my better half, my best friend.  It goes with me everywhere," said Claire Glynn. 

Claire isn't alone; most teenage boys are attached to the technology too. Matt Godfrey says he has had a cell phone since fifth grade and texts often. 

But it's the texting not the talking that's got kids hooked.  And as most of know, texting has a language of its own. 

A group of seventh graders at Edison Middle School in Tulsa are fluent in it. 

"I usually leave out a lot of the vowels, just because it's quicker. Like when I put want I usually put 'wnt' things like that," said Jackson Stoever. 

Language arts teacher Susan Griffin says texting shorthand is even showing up in her students work. 

"I have kids that will use the number 2 instead of to or too. They put 'lol' in the middle of a paragraph. Or 'OMG', and they're amazed when we circle it or say don't do this, well why not!" said Susan Griffin. 

Then there's the writing itself, misspellings, lack of sentence structure and Mrs. Griffin says many of her students have lost the art of cursive. 

For some that means relearning what was taught in third grade. 

Mrs. Griffin says a lot of the schools in Tulsa Public Schools are re-teaching what was taught in elementary school.  For seven weeks her class will go over nothing but writing and storytelling.

"They need to know there's a difference between how you speak to your friends, how you text your friends versus more formal writing you use in school or the business world and that's the battle we're fighting," Susan Griffin said. 

But some students say the art of writing isn't just lost on them.

"My sister doesn't have very good handwriting and neither do my parents," said Jackson Stoever. 

Jackson says he is determined to get better and Mrs. Griffin says he and his classmates improving.  She just hopes the lesson will stick the second time around. 

"It's preparing them for the future? Hopefully! Right, Yep 'OMG'", said Susan Griffin. 

Cursive writing has more going for it than just being pretty too.  One Tulsa teacher says it could actually improve brain function.

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